Month: February 2020

IAAF crisis a big worry for Bolt … Slams moves to reset world recordsIAAF crisis a big worry for Bolt … Slams moves to reset world records

first_imgTrack and field’s golden boy, Usain Bolt, says he felt ‘let down’ by the sport’s leaders following recent doping and bribery controversies but thinks that suggestions to reset the world records – including the three that he currently holds are pointless. Bolt, who was on Friday evening named the 2015 RJR Sports Foundation National Sportsman of the Year, admitted shock at the crisis currently engulfing the sport with former IAAF president Lamine Diack currently facing criminal investigations around allegations he accepted bribes to sweep positive drugs tests under the carpet. The issues affecting the sport have also seen Russia being banned from competition after being accusations of a state-backed, systematic doping system. This led to UK Athletics last week releasing a document ‘A Manifesto for clean athletics’ detailing several proposals, it believes will protect clean athletes and recover the sport’s credibility, including a controversial suggestion to wipe the record books clean. The Jamaican sprinter, whose world records in the 100m (9.58), 200m (19.19) and as a member of the Jamaican 4x100m that ran 36.84 at the 2012 Olympic Games in London, would be wiped if UK Athletics has its way, admitted shock at the crisis. “When I heard the news it was quite shocking because as far as I was concerned, they were doing a good job to clean up the sport and to hear something like that was quite shocking,” Bolt said of the troubles plaguing his sport. “You feel let down as an athlete, from wanting to help clean up the sport and then for something like this to happen coming from the body of the sport,” Bolt noted. The six-time Olympic and 11-time World Championships gold medal winner, however, thinks that the suggestions to erase the world records is pointless and thinks the focus should be on ensuring that the sport’s future is a positive one. “I found it really funny, as my coach would say, you can’t change history so what they are saying (suggestions to erase records) is really pointless. What’s done is done we have to just move forward and try to make the next Olympics and World Championships and records as best as we can and look to the future. We can’t worry about the past,” Bolt added.last_img read more

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Uphill task for Ja ScorpionsUphill task for Ja Scorpions

first_imgNORTH SOUND, Antigua (CMC):Jamaica Scorpions, set 366 for victory by Leeward Islands Hurricanes, were 58 for two at the close of the third day of their sixth-round, Regional First Class championship game at the Vivian Richards Cricket Stadium yesterday.Scores: HURRICANES 155 (Daron Cruickshank 51, Montcin Hodge 41; Damion Jacobs 5-50, Nikita Miller 4-63) and 368 for eight declared. (Jahmar Hamilton 130 not out, Montcin Hodge 72, Orlando Peters 41, Daron Cruickshank 20; Nikita Miller 4-107, Damion Jacobs 3-100).SCORPIONS 158 (Sheldon Cottrell 37, AndrÈ McCarthy 27, Jermaine Blackwood 26; Rahkeem Cornwall 5-74) & 58 for two.AT THE NATIONAL STADIUM IN GUYANA: Trinidad and Tobago Red Force, replying to Guyana Jaguars’ 237, were 136 for three in their first innings at the close of the second day yesterday.Scores: JAGUARS 237 (Vishaul Singh 104 not out, Veerasammy Permaul 47, Leon Johnson 23; Marlon Richards 3-41, Rayad Emrit 3-44, Jon-Russ Jagessar 3-59)RED FORCE 136 for three (Yannic Cariah 58 not out, Evin Lewis 26).AT KENSINGSTON OVAL: Barbados Pride, replying to Windward Islands Volcanoes’ 250 all out, were 272 for two in their first innings at the close on the second day.Scores: VOLCANOES 250 (AndrÈ Fletcher 84, Kavem Hodge 53, Shane Shillingford 28; Miguel Cummings 5-47, Sulieman Benn 3-65).PRIDE 272 for two (Kraigg Brathwaite 117, Shai Hope 98 not out, Kyle Corbin 38).last_img read more

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Pumped up WI target upset in World T20 semis against IndiaPumped up WI target upset in World T20 semis against India

first_imgMUMBAI, India (CMC):West Indies go toe to toe with hosts and title favourites India in the second semi-final of the Twenty20 World Cup today in a game captain Darren Sammy has labelled a ‘David and Goliath’ battle.India, with the advantage of familiar conditions, the partisan home crowd and a convincing win over the Windies in the official pre-tournament warm-ups, enter the 7 p.m. (9:30 a.m. Eastern Caribbean time) contest at the Wankhede Stadium as heavy favourites.But West Indies, the 2012 champions, remain a huge threat, and Sammy said they were backing themselves to upset India.”The guys who predict the results say (the chances of winning) are 80-20 (in India’s favour), so it feels like a David and Goliath (battle), but people tend to forget David won the fight,” Sammy told reporters here yesterday.INDIAN LOVE”It’s something similar to that. We enjoy playing against India. A number of our players play here and we have a lot of respect for them. The camaraderie in the group in both teams is really good, so we’re looking forward to that, and what better place to play than here in Mumbai – one of the best wickets in India.”He added: “Once we believe among ourselves, it doesn’t matter what other people think. As a group, we believe in each other’s ability. We believe in the talent, and at the end of the day, cricket is played on the pitch.”You could talk all you want. I could talk a good game, but it’s the action on the pitch that really matters.”West Indies opened their Group One campaign with a convincing six-wicket victory over England before following up with positive results over Sri Lanka by seven wickets and South Africa by three wickets.Their only blemish came in the final game last Sunday against minnows Afghanistan, when they were stunned by six runs in Nagpur.West Indies lifted the T20 World Cup for the first time four years ago when they beat Sri Lanka in a thrilling final in Colombo. Two years later in Bangladesh, they went out in the semi-finals as Sri Lanka rebounded to win the title.HOPES FOR CLEAN SWEEPEarlier this year, West Indies Under-19s also won the ICC Youth World Cup in Bangladesh, and with West Indies Women also contesting their T20 World Cup semi-final against New Zealand Women today, Sammy said he was hoping for a clean sweep of titles for the Caribbean.”The Under-19 team started it in Bangladesh and both the men and the women’s teams took that as inspiration. Come tomorrow, we have two West Indian teams vying for a spot in the final,” he noted.”I really wish both the teams could go to the finals and win it, so 2016 could be the year where West Indies take home everything.”The guys in the dressing room are aware what is at stake. We came into the tournament and nobody gave us a chance. I said six steps to the World Cup. We have taken four … we have two more steps and tomorrow’s (today) step is against India. We are looking forward to it.”last_img read more

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Points standingPoints standing

first_imgPoints standingP W D L GF GA GD Pts1. Leicester City 35 22 10 3 63 33 30 762. Tottenham 34 19 11 4 64 25 39 683. Man City 35 19 7 9 66 34 32 644. Arsenal 35 18 10 7 58 34 24 645. Man United 34 17 8 9 42 30 12 596. West Ham 34 14 14 6 57 43 14 567. Liverpool 34 15 10 9 58 45 13 558. Southampton 35 15 9 11 49 37 12 549. Chelsea 34 12 11 11 53 46 7 4710. Stoke City 35 13 8 14 37 51 -14 4711. Everton 34 9 14 11 53 48 5 4112. Watford 34 11 8 15 33 40 -7 4113. Bournemouth 35 11 8 16 42 61 -19 4114. West Brom 34 10 10 14 31 42 -11 4015.Swansea City 35 10 10 15 34 49 -15 4016. Crystal Palace 35 10 9 16 36 45 -9 3917. Sunderland 34 7 10 17 39 57 -18 3118. Norwich City 34 8 7 19 35 60 -25 3119. Newcastle 35 7 9 19 38 64 -26 3020. Aston Villa 35 3 7 25 25 69 -44 16last_img

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Foster’s Fairplay: Time for a changeFoster’s Fairplay: Time for a change

first_img TRACK AND FIELD GLORY DAYS Taking the parlous state of Test cricket into active consideration, one fears a trickle over into the sport that is now bringing such joy to our people. It is also advertising the nation and its attributes to the world, who is watching on television, when the little rock called Jamaica blows away the most powerful nations on the global stage. The Usain Bolt and Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce breakout in 2008 in Beijing and their prolonged maintenance of tenure at the top rung have taken effect. All actors have been alerted to the reality that there is money in the sport and in copious quantities. There is a host of cloak and dagger games being played out with the ‘innocent’ athletes as the carrot. Allegations state that they are being forced into contracts with them as the silent partner. Uncaring coaches, the big cash returns superseding sound judgement, are left unmolested to exploit the talents of their charges. Shoe companies, too, play their role. The sickening effect mushrooms as parents and guardians are in need of the newly injected funds to keep household pots on the fire. What is missing is the knowledge required to be able to properly monitor the coaches, who them as their meal ticket to prosperity. Someone or organisation has to either ‘bell the cat’ or ‘sound the trumpet’ on these questionable activities threatening to destroy the Beijing 2008 template. The case rests, as the show of hands is awaited. – Send feedback to lauriefoster2012@gmail.com. The sport of track and field continues to enjoy days of glory. Jamaican sprinters are the envy of the world. The quarter-milers are ganging up for a return to the days of the Helsinki 1952 Olympics foursome. The Racers and MVP track clubs are churning out quality athletes, some to the benefit of adopted countries to whom they have redirected their allegiance. Through the dreams of a few coaches, dedicated to sharing the spotlight – and Julian Leonard Robinson and Michael Vassell must be mentioned – world-class throwers are emerging. Jamaica, with sports aficio-nados gaping in disbelief, qualified three discus men to be at the Beijing World Champs last year. Having two of our male sprint hurdlers making the final at that elite event was both startling and spoke to good days ahead in the discipline for that gender. The women had accomplished that time and again. None other than five-timer at the Olympics, Juliet Cuthbert-Flynn, with the added benefit of a political platform, said recently on social media that more medals than the 12 mined at London 2012 could be expected this summer in Rio. All that said, where is Foster’s Fairplay taking its highly respected readers this week? The image of West Indies cricket, built on the real version, is taking a severe beating. One has to be prepared for a verbal broadside from friend and fellow analyst, Oral Tracey, for the usage of the word ‘real’. He is known and respected in the arena of comedy. However, he sees nothing comic in his often-stated view that Test cricket, as a spectacle, is like a three-dollar bill – non-existent. However, that scenario is not of immediate concern to this column. Followers of sports Jamaica-style still hold fond memories of the world dominance of West Indies cricket. To avoid confusion with the versions in which regional teams claimed three titles recently, the reference is to the Test format. With the land of Bob Marley and the Reggae Boyz having a significant player input, the breathtaking brilliance touched three decades. With minimal threats to the ascendancy established under skipper Clive Lloyd to be continued with Viv Richards at the helm, there were series whippings administered one after the other. Scheduled five-day matches, being completed in three days, became a feature. The most fearsome foes, England and Australia, were flattened at home and abroad. The former suffered on two occasions what was first called a whitewash – five Test match batterings to nil. In short order, to highlight the ethnicity of the victors, the term ‘blackwash’ was coined. All this came to a sad end in 1995, when the Aussies injected their earlier conquerors with a losing serum. The effect is long and lasting. Debate as to what went wrong continues to rage. MONEY IN SPORTSlast_img read more

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