Funding For Community Mental Health Projects

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first_img Attention Deficit Association of N.S. in Lower Sackville receives $20,389 to develop an information kit for parents and care providers on attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Lower Sackville; Building Community Capacity for Mental Health in Bridgewater receives $25,500 to establish a mental health information network, promote mental health knowledge and develop and maintain a district network of mental health consumers, family members and community organizations; Survivors of Abuse Recovering (S.O.A.R.) Society receives $37,300 to enhance its ability to deliver peer counselling, support groups, co-facilitation, community education and outreach. The group serves Hants, Kings and Annapolis counties and has assisted Yarmouth area residents in setting up a S.O.A.R. chapter; Schizophrenia Society, Cumberland County Chapter, receives $15,000 to provide half-day workshops in five communities (Amherst, Springhill, Oxford/Wallace, Parrsboro, River Hebert) to raise awareness of schizophrenia and mental illness; Crossroads in Sydney receives $20,000 for seed money to develop a business proposal and to secure additional funding to start a laundry service that will employ mental health consumers; Eating Disorder Action Group in Halifax receives $29,560 to develop and pilot a train-the-trainers manual, and to build capacity across the province for eating disorder self-help and support groups; Share & Care Self-Help and Support Group in Bridgewater receives $1,000 to produce public education materials. “With this funding, we can bring together information from socialworkers, police, community services, legal professionals andothers who work with people with mental illness on a regularbasis,” said Michael MacDonald, president of the SchizophreniaSociety, Cumberland County Chapter. “Being the father of a youngadult with schizophrenia, I am pleased to know that fivecommunities in Cumberland County will be more informed on issuesconcerning mental illness.” The Halifax-based Eating Disorder Action Group is receivingfunding for the project Building Capacity, Building Support: SelfHelp and Support Group Development for Individuals ExperiencingEating Disorders and their Families. “We are pleased the Department of Health recognizes theseriousness of disordered eating and the positive impact localsupport groups can have with individuals and families,” saidBethana Sullivan, the action group’s executive director. “Thisproject will help reach more people who have experienced thedisorder, so they can use their strengths and stories to supportone another and become healthier.” The department invited proposals from community groups in June “I want to thank these volunteers for their leadership andvision,” said Mr. MacIsaac. “All Nova Scotians want a healthier,more prosperous future. And these projects move us closer to thatgoal. I encourage people to submit proposals next year as webuild on the work already started.” The program granted $150,000 to six community groups in 2002-03. Evaluations are not yet complete. Thirteen applications for funding were received. Mental health staff, with support from the district health authorities, then chose the seven finalists. Each finalist must complete a formal evaluation to make sure the projects deliver the benefits that were identified in the application process. Nova Scotians with mental illness are receiving more support intheir communities with about $150,000 in funding for community-based projects. Health Minister Angus MacIsaac is highlighting, for the secondyear, funding for local projects involving the people who usemental health services. “This government has a plan to improve mental health programsacross the province. These are meaningful projects that willsupport individuals with mental health issues and disorders, aswell as providing important information to families, careproviders and communities,” said Mr. MacIsaac. The seven local projects to receive one-year government fundinginclude:last_img read more

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Raped by dad woman manages to save sister from similar fate

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first_imgLucknow: In a shocking incident, a 22-year-old woman has alleged that she was repeatedly raped by her father for over a decade with her mother’s “active consent” who even gave her contraceptives. The girl, who lives in Chinhat on the outskirts of Lucknow, told the police that she had reconciled to her fate, but when her father started sexually abusing her younger sister; she mustered courage and approached the police. The 44-year-old accused father has been booked under the Protection of Children from Sexual Offences (POCSO) Act, 2012, on charges of raping and sexually abusing his two daughters. He is absconding and the mother, 42, has been arrested for abetting the crime. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’ The two survivors have recorded their statements before a magistrate. The elder daughter approached an NGO who, with the help of the police, rescued the girls from their home. The elder daughter is living in her home while the younger sister, a minor, has been sent to a shelter home. SHO Chinhat, Sachin Singh, said the father had been booked for rape, causing miscarriage without a woman’s consent and criminal intimidation, and also under the POCSO Act 8 Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&K Archana Singh, in charge of the NGO Asha Jyoti Kendra, said the survivor told her that she was being raped since the tender age of six. “Her mother knew about it all along and used to give her contraceptives and medicines to abort pregnancies. She told me that she had accepted the torture as her destiny but could not tolerate it when her father started molesting her younger sister,” she said. She further said that recently, their father became more aggressive and even started writing them sexually explicit letters. “The complainant said that their two brothers (aged 18 and 8 years), the tenant in their house and some of their relatives knew about the actions of her father but no one opposed it. “Finally, she mustered enough courage and narrated everything to her principal, who then asked her to contact our NGO,” Singh said.last_img read more

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RioCan says more than half of former Zellers location has been leased

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RioCan Real Estate Investment Trust says it’s well on its way to replace all the rental income that it once received from nine former Zellers locations that were vacated in the first half of this year.The Toronto-based trust, which has one of Canada’s largest portfolios of retail and commercial properties, says 62 per cent of the vacated Zellers space has been leased and will begin generating 102 per cent of revenue as it comes on stream.RioCan says its operating funds from operations grew to $121 million in the three months ended June 30, up 14 per cent from $106 million a year earlier.Overall occupancy was little changed but slipped to 96.7 per cent as of June 30, down from 97.4 per cent a year earlier.On a per-unit basis, operating funds from operations was 40 cents, up from 37 cents a year ago.The operating funds from operations and adjusted earnings are more closely watched by analysts than net income, which includes a number of non-operating items such as the estimated value of its properties.Net earnings attributable to unit holders was $153 million, down from $409 million a year earlier, mostly because of adjustments to the fair value of its holdings.Adjusted earnings excluding taxes and fair value adjustments was $112 million, up from $106 million a year earlier.RioCan units were at $24.64 on the Toronto Stock Exchange, up nine cents. read more

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Fans visiting Stranger Things sets bring boon to business

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PALMETTO, Ga. — A small-town grocery store in Georgia has grown in popularity and sold more Eggo waffles than ever in recent years, thanks to Netflix’s “Stranger Things.”Fans of the ’80s sci-fi show have sought out filming locations such as the former Bradley’s Big Buy grocery store in Palmetto since the show premiered in 2016. The third season has prompted more fans to visit Georgia, benefiting local businesses.According to Netflix, “Stranger Things 3” broke records for the streaming service. Within four days of release, 40.7 million accounts had started watching and 18.2 million had already finished it entirely.Fans are dressing up as characters, reenacting scenes and taking photos at the grocery store, Gwinnett Place Mall and downtown Jackson.Andrea Smith, The Associated Press read more

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Nigers neighbours also stricken by hunger UN reports

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In Mali, 1.1 million people will need food aid in 2005, mainly in the regions of Moptu, Timbuktu and Gao, and 5,000 children in the north already suffer from acute malnutrition with infant mortality reaching record levels in some areas.In Burkina Faso, some 500,000 people need assistance and migrations in search of food have been noted. An evaluation in areas of particular concern has found that 11 per cent of children aged one to five suffer from moderate malnutrition, while 6 per cent suffer from acute malnutrition. In Mauritania, where some 750,000, or 26 per cent of the population, have been affected by last year’s locust invasion, the UN World Food Programme (WFP) is on the ground, assessing the scope of the situation.In Niger, where 2.5 million people confront hunger and thousands of children have already died, international food aid began arriving in an airlift last week.UN Emergency Relief Coordinator Jan Egeland told a news briefing on Friday he was now hopeful that most of the $30.7 million so far sought for Niger would be forthcoming, with $25 million already in hand or pledged, but that the figure would again be revised upwards.”Over the last few days, the world has finally woken up, but it took graphic images of dying children for this to happen,” he said. read more

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UN convenes scientists to study nuclear power plant risks from natural disasters

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“Learning from the lessons of this latest tsunami as well as from other flood events that occurred in the past will allow the review, revision and expansion, as appropriate of the Agency Safety Standards on external flooding hazards,” International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Nuclear Installation Safety director Ken Brockman said. The five-day International Workshop on External Flooding Hazards at Nuclear Power Plant Sites will begin on 29 August at India´s Kalpakkam nuclear power plant, which withstood the giant waves that engulfed the small township, home to India´s centre for atomic research. Battered but safe, the plant shut down automatically after detectors tripped it as the water level rose. There was no release of radioactivity. The reactor was restarted 1 January 2005, six days after the catastrophic waves struck India´s east coast. “There are scores of nuclear power plants operating in coastal areas and some of these may need to take a renewed look at this external hazard,” IAEA Director of Nuclear Power Akira Omoto said. “It is also true for plants presently under construction.” It is common for nuclear power plants to be built in coastal areas, drawing the seawater to cool the reactor. The IAEA has stringent safety standards designed to guard nuclear power plants against natural calamities like earthquakes, volcanoes, flooding, tsunamis and cyclones. The non-legally binding guidelines cover site and design requirements, as well as appropriate monitoring and warning systems. Japan, which has developed systems to evaluate and protect reactors against the earthquakes and tsunamis regularly striking there, will provide guidance and share its experiences at the 17-country workshop. Case studies will be presented by countries such as France, where the Le Blayais reactor was hit by severe storms in December 1999. The IAEA issued the Kalpakkam reactor a clean bill of health in the tsunami´s wake, rating the event a ‘zero’ or of ‘no safety significance’ on the International Nuclear Events Scale. Around 3.5 cubic metres of seawater, sludge and muck entered a construction pit, where the foundations for a new Fast Breeder Reactor were being built. Water also entered a pump house for cooling water, tripping the nuclear power plant to shut down. read more

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FEATURE Out from the shadows victims of terrorism take centre stage at

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“The international community speaks about fighting terrorism, but we need to pay more attention to the human consequences of this global scourge,” Jehangir Khan, Director of the Office of the United Nations Counter-Terrorism Implementation Task Force (CTITF), told the UN News Centre. “We need to ensure that the needs of victims and their families are met,” Mr. Khan said. “We have to do better collectively to listen to the voices and needs of the victims and their families and show support and solidarity” he added. Although victims bear the brunt of terrorist attacks, they are often forgotten after the initial media interest surrounding the attacks inevitably evaporates. But with terrorist attacks having been reported in some 40 UN Member Sates over the past two years, and deaths and injuries continuing to mount, victims of terrorism will take center stage as the General Assembly begins it’s review of the UN Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy. “The voices of victims of terrorism, who have suffered silently for far too long, also provide a powerful counter-narrative to the insidious propaganda of terrorists around the world,” said Mr. Jehangir.In that spirit, on Wednesday, in the presence of two UN staff who survived the 2003 bombing of UN headquarters in Baghdad, the Organization will launch a UN Victims of Terrorism Support Portal. This means, with a few simple clicks, victims and their families will have the means to look for practical support and assistance from anywhere in the world. The web platform is designed so that anyone can look up by country where they can seek medical, psychological, social and material support, as well as legal resources available to victims, and a list of organizations that are able to assist victims’ coping with the trauma of a terrorist attack. As the website collects more information, it will grow into a repository for resources available to support victims, their families, communities and other organizations working on issues related to victims. The recommendation for such a platform to help in building awareness of the cause of victims of terrorism and offer a tangible support base to alleviate their suffering came when UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon for the first time ever at the global level convened, victims, Governments, experts and civil society at a Symposium he convened on Supporting Victims of Terrorism in 2008. And in his most recent report to the General Assembly on UN Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy , the Secretary-General noted that “the international community also needs to remember and support victims of terrorism.” Reporting that there have been tens of thousands of additional victims and terrorism had spread to new areas in new and more challenging forms since the adoption of the strategy in 2006, the UN chief outlines a number of recommendations focusing on preventive aspects of counter-terrorism. The report will serve as a basis for the Fourth Review of the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy by the General Assembly to be held from June11-13. On the agenda are events examining such issues as “Conditions Conducive to the Spread of Terrorism” to the “Protection of Critical Tourism Infrastructure”, as well as “Countering Violent Extremism and Promoting Community Engagement in West Africa and the Sahel”, and the “Role of Young Community Leaders to Foster Resilient Communities.” On the 13th of June, the General Assembly is expected to adopt a strong consensus resolution endorsing the Secretary General’s recommendations to make the Organization more responsive to the evolving global threat of terrorism – best demonstrated by the new UN Victims of Terrorism Support Portal. read more

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UKs most abundant wildflower to be revealed as Plant Life launches bank

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Carpets of daisies, dandelions and buttercups herald the beginning of summer in Britain, and this May bank holiday those lazing in their gardens have been asked to count the wildflowers on their lawn.The most abundant wildflower in Britain will be revealed after the first ever national nectar survey takes place this weekend.Gardeners across the country have been asked by charity Plantlife to take part in a “citizen science” project to count blooms in their lawn to work out how valuable our gardens are for butterflies and honeybees.Charities including the RHS have recently asked British people to be gentler on their lawns, letting flowers grow instead of insisting on smooth, unbroken green.This is because nearly 7.5 million acres of meadows and pastures rich in wildflowers have been lost since the 1930s, removing a vital source of food for pollinators, many of which are now in decline.Not only is it worrying for those who enjoy looking at bright blooms when they walk around the countryside, it is terrible news for pollinators. According to Plantlife, one acre of wildflower meadow on a single day in summer can contain three million flowers, producing 1kg ( 2lb 3oz) of nectar – enough to support nearly 96,000 honeybees per day.Now, Britain’s 15 million gardens, many of them with lawns, could become an increasingly important habitat for supporting species of bees, butterflies and other bugs looking for nectar. A daisy reflected in dew To take part in the flower count, garden-owners should throw a ball to pick a random patch of lawn, mark out a metre square area and count the flowers they find, such as common daisies, red clover, dandelions, dove’s foot cranesbill and buttercups.The information will be used to calculate how much nectar lawns are providing and how many bees they could support, and to build up a picture of their support for nature across the country through a “national nectar score”.It will allow Plantlife to see if lawns can be managed differently to increase the national nectar score, what the most abundant flowers are and how they can be encouraged, and help monitor changing trends over time.Plantlife’s botanical expert Dr Trevor Dines said: “Our call for ‘no mow May’ has helped turn our famous trimmed green lawns into riots of colour with buttercups, daises and dandelions offering much-needed food for our starving bees and butterflies.”He added: “Everyone who takes part in ‘every flower counts’ will receive their own ‘personal nectar score’ showing them how many honey bees their lawn can actually support.”We’ll find out which flowers are most prolific on our lawns – will it be daisies, buttercups or clover? – and we will combine the results to produce a ‘national nectar score’, showing just how important Britain’s lawns are for our beleaguered pollinators.”We hope this will make people look differently at their lawns and encourage them to allow more wild flowers to grow in support of millions of bees – because for them every flower really does count.”To find out more, and calculate your own nectar score, click the link here. A daisy reflected in dewCredit:AFP Contributor Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

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Georgiou bows out true to form

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first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Petro Georgiou has denounced Tony Abbott’s plan to turn back asylum-seeker boats as cruel and undeserving of support, in his valedictory speech last Tuesday. Mr Georgiou, born in Kerkyra, was elected in 1994 as the Member for Kooyong and is regarded as a true liberal and an architect of multicultural policies. In his speech he highlighted how he sat on the floor of the House of Representatives in 1975, as an adviser to Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser.He reflected on how the “supply crisis did not harm Australian democracy” adding that, “[it] attests to the resilience of our political system.“The fact that Gough [Whitlam] and Malcolm [Fraser] reconciled years ago is a tribute to their stature as national leaders.” Mr Georgiou said. The veteran MP accused both major parties of regressing to a punitive approach, making vulnerable people political footballs.After a career as a Liberal Party administrator and ministerial adviser particularly in service of Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser, Mr Georgiou spent much of theHoward era at the centre of a small group of liberals whose views on border protection, civil liberties and social justice were mostly in stark contrast with the majority of his party.Mr Georgiou is regarded as one of the chief architects of multiculturalism, particularly in the establishment of SBS Television. He reflected on the emergence of the “pernicious influence of Hansonism” which “stirred racial prejudice” and how multiculturalism, “one of Australia’s unique accomplishments was denigrated” while “asylum seekers were subjected to increasingly harsh measures.”His preparedness to stand on principle may have retarded his career path under Howard’s leadership, but won him widespread respect among Liberal and Labor supporters. “On some issues, however, I was unable to support the position of the party majority. A Liberal Member of Parliament has the right to do this.”Mr Georgiou also warned both sides of the house of a new “dark chapter.”He said while Howard’s economic legacy is self-evident, the era’s denigration of multiculturalism and its tough approach to asylum-seekers had caused him “grave concern.” Mr Georgiou said he thought changes to asylum-seeker policy and the later election of the Labor Government had closed a “dark chapter” in the nation’s history. But, “that chapter has been reopened. Regression has become the order of the day. With an increase in boat arrivals, asylum-seekers are being subjected to increasingly virulent attacks.”Mr Georgiou attacked the Opposition Leader’s plan to turn back asylum-seeker boats and process asylum-seekers in unnamed third countries.He was critical of Labor for no longer processing asylum claims from Afghans and Sri Lankans and reopening the Curtin Detention centre. Mr Georgiou went on to thank his mother Anastasia and late father Constandino Georgiou “for their enormous affection and commitment to their children despite the pressures and anxieties of migration.” He thanked his children Constandino and Alexia, who he says “felt the impact of my involvement in politics” from a young age, calling them “admirable young people.”At the end of Mr. Georgiou’s valedictory speech there was effusive applause from both sides of the House as well as the gallery.last_img read more

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Hybrid crosswalk signal installed near Clark College

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first_imgThe city of Vancouver has installed a new hybrid crosswalk that uses a red signal beacon and signs to alert drivers to pedestrians crossing Fort Vancouver Way at Clark College.The pedestrian beacon, sometimes referred to as a HAWK (High-intensity Activated crossWalK), is the first to be installed in Vancouver. The new beacon is expected to command more attention from drivers than traditional yellow-light pedestrian signals, the city said in a statement.When not activated, the signal is dark. When activated by pedestrians using a button, the signal moves through the following steps:• The overhead beacon emits a flashing yellow light that changes to a solid yellow light, advising drivers to prepare to stop.• Then, the signal beacon light changes to a solid red, requiring drivers to come to a complete stop behind the stop bar lines on the street. At the same time, a “walk” symbol is displayed to pedestrian.• Next, a flashing “don’t walk” symbol is displayed for pedestrians along with a countdown indicating time left to cross. At that point, drivers will see an alternating flashing red signal indicating they may proceed with caution, after having come to a full stop and after the pedestrians have cleared the crosswalk.Drivers are not required to stop when the beacon is dark, similar to a highway ramp meter that is not in use, the city said.For more information about the crosswalk, visit www.cityofvancouver.us/SignalsSigns.last_img read more

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Man arrested in assault of TriMet bus driver

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first_imgPortland transit police say they’ve made an arrest in an assault on a female TriMet bus driver during a north Portland fare dispute.A man was arrested Friday evening near the spot where the assault took place Thursday night. He was not immediately identified.Transit police Lt. Eric Schober said officers spotted a man walking out of a residence who looked like a grainy image from a bus security video. The man had been described as 5-foot-5 and 300 pounds. Schober said officers had figured the man lived in the area.TriMet had offered a $1,000 reward for information leading to an arrest.Transit agency spokeswoman Roberta Altstadt said Friday the unidentified driver is recovering.Trimet said the operator was repeatedly punched after telling a rider who had boarded about a half mile earlier that he did not pay the correct fare. The bus was parked at the time. The man reportedly began yelling at the driver, then started hitting her. Altstadt said the driver fought off the attacker, who left on foot.last_img read more

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Arrest made in connection to Hollywood sex assault home invasion

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first_imgHOLLYWOOD, FLA. (WSVN) – Police have made an arrest in connection to a home invasion that ended with a sexual assault in Hollywood.Investigators arrested 35-year-old Andre Brian McGriff, Friday.Detectives said DNA evidence collected at the scene led to McGriff’s arrest. “Ultimately, it did come down to the DNA being a match and coming back to both of those incidents,” said Miranda Grossman of the Hollywood Police Department.Police said the suspect broke into a Hollywood home on Jan. 18 and sexually assaulted the homeowner.The suspect was also arrested for the burglary and assault of a 13-year-old victim on Dec. 4, where the suspect sexually molested the teen. This also happened in Hollywood.On or about Nov. 18, as well as Jan. 11, there were similar occupied burglaries in close proximity with the same “modus operandi.”Detectives found McGriff Thursday morning and monitored him before arresting him Friday morning. “This criminal could have committed more burglaries, could have been involved in other incidents,” said Grossman, “and that’s why we need people to come forward.”Those seen entering McGriff’s home hid their faces from 7News cameras.McGriff faces charges of sexual battery, burglary, burglary with assault, petit theft, false imprisonment and lewd/lascivious molestation. The suspect faces life in prison if convicted.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

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Recent Wilmington Real Estate Transactions

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first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are the real estate transactions in Wilmington that occurred from July 9, 2019 to July 16, 2019:Address: 3 Boutwell StreetPrice: $425,000Buyer: James GalloSeller: Jillian Caraviello-White & Peter WhiteDate: 7/15/19Use: 1-Family ResidenceLot Size: 27,000 sfAddress: 31-R Boutwell StreetPrice: $940,000Buyer: Stephen & Nicole FiolaSeller: Raymond & Kimberly SmithDate: 7/12/19Use: 1-Family ResidenceLot Size: 61,742 sfAddress: 8 Cleveland AvenuePrice: $391,200Buyer: Melissa KarnoSeller: Anne WilliamsDate: 7/10/19Use: 1-Family ResidenceLot Size: 27,191 sfAddress: 6 Dartmouth AvenuePrice: $663,000Buyer: Harrison & Shelby BrandSeller: Andrew & Christine AmendolaDate: 7/15/19Use: 1-Family ResidenceLot Size: 15,715 sfAddress: 104 Marion StreetPrice: $720,000Buyer: Ngoc & David HoSeller: Martin Allan, Trustee for MJA RTDate: 7/11/19Use: Residential Developed LandLot Size: 13,559 sfAddress: 258 Middlesex AvenuePrice: $620,000Buyer: Deep SinghSeller: Brian & Maria KeeleyDate: 7/15/19Use: 1-Family ResidenceLot Size: 58,806 sfAddress: 1 North StreetPrice: $423,000Buyer: Sara Pensanelli & Thomas QuinnSeller: Estelle BulgerDate: 7/15/19Use: 1-Family ResidenceLot Size: 20,000 sfAddress: 54 North StreetPrice: $624,000Buyer: Alessandro & Maria LemboSeller: Eric Lawson & Sharon Sullivan-LawsonDate: 7/11/19Use: 1-Family ResidenceLot Size: 17,274 sfAddress: 168 Woburn StreetPrice: $674,900Buyer: Keith & Amy SimmonsSeller: James HayesDate: 7/15/19Use: 1-Family ResidenceLot Size: 30,752 sfAddress: 508 Woburn StreetPrice: $500,000Buyer: William & Karen KeoughSeller: Frank FerranteDate: 7/15/19Use: 1-Family ResidenceLot Size: 29,040 sfAddress: 512 Woburn StreetPrice: $300,000Buyer: David McCue, Trustee for Tieri RTSeller: William & Karen KeoughDate: 7/15/19Use: 1-Family ResidenceLot Size: 20,476 sfLike Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedRecent Wilmington Real Estate TransactionsIn “Business”Recent Wilmington Real Estate TransactionsIn “Business”Recent Wilmington Real Estate TransactionsIn “Business”last_img read more

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Polaris Sculpture Is New Fairbanks Centerpiece

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first_imgThe city of Fairbanks has a new centerpiece sculpture. The assemblage of silver steel spires stands between the Cushman and Barnett Street bridges, along the Chena River downtown. The sculpture called “Polaris” was created by a pair of Vancouver based artists to mirror the local environment.Download Audiolast_img

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Quader masterminds the attack Rizvi

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first_imgRuhul Kabir Rizvi. File photoBangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) senior joint secretary general Ruhul Kabir Rizvi has claimed that road transport and bridges minister Obaidul Quader, who is also ruling Awami League (AL) general secretary, is behind the attack that took place on BNP chairperson Khaleda Zia’s convoy.“He [Quader] carried out this attack at the behest of the prime minister, Sheikh Hasina,” Rizvi said, addressing a press conference on Sunday at BNP’s central office at Naya Paltan in the city. Awami League leaders on Saturday said that the attack was the result of BNP’s internal conflict.Countering a remark by AL leaders that the BNP leader was travelling to Cox’s Bazaar by road in order to create chaos, Ruhul Kabir Rizvi said, “The road route is the safest. Doesn’t Obaidul Quader travel by road? Doesn’t his leader and others of their party? There are innumerable such examples. Why is this issue raised now?”When the prime minister returns to the country from abroad, schools and colleges are forcefully shut down, roads are blocked and everyone suffers.Read more: Khaleda’s convoy attacked, 15 vehicles vandalisedTerming the ruling AL a “deep conspirator”, Rizvi said, “These issues are being raised to deflect people’s attention towards a different direction.”The BNP leader alleged thousands of people fled Myanmarese persecution into Bangladesh whereas the government could register no protests against it.“The AL government has been isolated from the people. That’s why, it is considering creation of chaos and terrorism the only way to cling onto the state power,” observed Rizvi.He alleged the AL has once again emerged as “a political party hated by the people by launching attacks on Khaleda Zia’s convoy”.last_img read more

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McKessons New Solution for Image Data Sharing

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first_imgSponsored Content | Videos | Enterprise Imaging | July 18, 2012 McKesson’s New Solution for Image, Data Sharing Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Recent Videos View all 606 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. 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He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports View all 9 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Women’s Health View all 62 items Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. McKesson’s new Enterprise Image Repository, featured at the 2012 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) meeting, facilitates the sharing of images and data both within and outside an organization. It enables sharing of data with referring physicians and also among different departments, all at an affordable cost. Find more SCCT news and videos Conference Coverage View all 396 items Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.”center_img Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Information Technology View all 220 items AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  McKesson’s New Solution for Image, Data SharingMcKesson Part 1Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 6:24Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -6:24 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM.last_img read more

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5year moratorium proposed on pineapple production in Costa Rica

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first_imgEdgardo Araya, a legislator for the Broad Front Party from Alajuela, and a number of community representatives from pineapple-producing zones, on Monday urged the executive branch to pass a decree that would place a moratorium on pineapple production for five years. They argued that pineapple producers have not been held accountable for the environmental impact of their activities.Community leaders from Río Jiménez de Guácimo, Upala and Los Chiles asserted that the massive pineapple producers are not only responsible for significant environmental degradation in rivers and aquifers, as well as harming wildlife, but that they have also had a negative impact on the economy of their communities.The decree proposal, named “Moratoria Nacional a la Expansion del Monocultivo Intensivo y Extensivo de la Piña,” calls for a moratorium on the expansion of single-crop pineapple plantations throughout the country for five years, or until certain requirements are met.Sofia Barquero, Mr. Araya’s assistant, told The Tico Times that the moratorium would specifically prohibit new permits for “intensive and extensive” pineapple plantations. She added that it would not affect small or “organic” plantations, nor would it affect large plantations that have already been permitted.Pineapple is one of Costa Rica’s most lucrative export industries, currently generating about $800 million a year. Industry growth began its upward climb in the year 2000. In the next decade, Costa Rican pineapple production increased by almost 300 percent.  Pineapple plantations cover about 45,000 hectares of countryside, according to the Agriculture and Livestock Ministry (MAG), although some skeptics question the transparency of those figures. The sweet fruit is now Costa Rica’s top agricultural export, with key markets in the United States and Europe.According to the proposal, during the five-year period the Environment Ministry and MAG, as well as local governments, would be responsible for making sure all environmental regulations are followed, and with the support of local universities and community representatives, establish committees to oversee implementation of the new law.The argument is that even though the massive expansion of pineapple production has resulted in jobs for local residents and Nicaraguan immigrants, it also has had three negative impacts. First, it has taken land away from smaller, local farmers who now have nowhere to plant their crops. Second, pineapple production is not generating any income for the local communities – only profits for the large corporations who own these plantations. Third, they allege that these companies pay very low wages and do not provide the social benefits normally guaranteed to Costa Rican workers.Petrona Oporta Corea, a community leader from Upala, told The Tico Times that large-scale single-crop pineapple plantations are displacing the small farmers who traditionally planted corn and beans.“For many years Upala was the primary producer of beans in the northern part of the country, and it seems that not even half of the normal crop will be produced next year, because many of the farming cooperatives have gone bankrupt, like Pueblo Nuevo,” she said.Oporta went on to explain that because local, traditional farmers don’t have land upon which to plant their crops, some rent land along the Nicaraguan border where they can’t insure their crops against natural disasters or bad weather. They have to absorb the cost of these kinds of losses themselves. Others simply plant within Nicaragua, but have their product confiscated when they try to bring it back into Costa Rica.She summed up the situation by saying that “this is how small farmers and local cooperatives are destroyed.”Legislator Araya also proposed a $1 tariff per box of pineapples exported, as a means of raising funds for local municipalities to help protect the environment.Recommended: Costa Rica will go all-in on pineapple exports. But is that a good thing? Facebook Comments Related posts:Costa Rica will go all-in on pineapple exports. But is that a good thing? Let the gas prices climb, but give us electric cars Awaiting a court decision, anti-GMO activists gain symbolic ground Whole Foods’ responsibly grown rating system labels Costa Rican bananas grown at EARTH University as ‘Best’last_img read more

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by The Associated Press Posted Feb 8 2019 65

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first_img by The Associated Press Posted Feb 8, 2019 6:56 am PDT LOS ANGELES — A man who authorities say broke into Rihanna’s Hollywood Hills home and spent 12 hours there when she was not home has pleaded no contest to stalking the singer.Los Angeles County prosecutors said Thursday that 27-year-old Eduardo Leon of Fullerton entered the plea to felony counts of stalking and vandalism and a misdemeanour count of resisting arrest.He was immediately sentenced to five years’ probation and 90 days of GPS monitoring. A judge also ordered him to stay away from Rihanna for 10 years, to stay off social media while on probation and to enter a program for mental health and drug treatment.Prosecutors said Leon leapt a fence and broke into the house on May 9. Twelve hours later, Rihanna’s assistant found him and called police.The Associated Press Man pleads no contest to stalking Rihanna at Hollywood home FILE – In this Sept. 13, 2018 file photo, singer Rihanna attends the 4th annual Diamond Ball in New York. A man who authorities say broke into Rihanna’s Hollywood Hills home and spent 12 hours there when she was not home has pleaded no contest to stalking the singer. Los Angeles County prosecutors said Thursday that 27-year-old Eduardo Leon of Fullerton entered the plea to felony counts of stalking and vandalism and a misdemeanor count of resisting arrest. He was immediately sentenced to five years’ probation and 90 days of GPS monitoring. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Emaillast_img read more

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Akinci calls for focus on property

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first_imgTurkish Cypriot leader Mustafa Akinci said on Thursday it was up to the new ‘government’ to create funds and speed up the application process for the Immovable Property Commission (IPC).“One of the first tasks of the new government should be the commission. Funds need to be found and the process sped up. It should not take years, as it does now,” Akinci said at a conference on the Cyprus problem at the Near East University in Nicosia.Parliamentary elections will be held in the north on January 7.Akinci was alluding to Tuesday’s European Court of Human Rights’ decision which unanimously upheld a complaint filed by a Greek Cypriot refugee against Turkey over the IPC’s lack of effectiveness.The IPC was set up in 2005 to deal with Greek Cypriot claims for compensation for their occupied properties.“Today, you might say the decision (ECHR) is not so severe, but tomorrow, we could face much worse results,” Akinci said.On the stalled Cyprus negotiations, the Turkish Cypriot leader said there could be some movement following the presidential elections in the south, adding that “it is neither right to paint a completely bleak picture nor to say 2018 will be the year of a solution”.Akinci also said that ‘open-ended, continuous negotiations are over’ and that he is ‘not ready to be part of such a process’.You May LikeLuxury Crossover SUV I Search AdsThese SUVs Are The Cream Of The Crop. Search For 2019 Luxury Crossover SUV DealsLuxury Crossover SUV I Search AdsUndoDr. Marty ProPower Plus Supplement3 Dangerous Foods People Feed Their Dogs (Without Realizing It)Dr. Marty ProPower Plus SupplementUndoE Commerce Platform I Search AdsSelling Online Has Never Been Easier. Search The Best E Commerce PlatformE Commerce Platform I Search AdsUndo Turkish Cypriot actions in Varosha ‘a clear violation’ of UN resolutions, Nicosia saysUndoConcern over falling tourism numbersUndoOur View: Argaka mukhtar should not act as if he owns the beachUndoby Taboolaby Taboolalast_img read more

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2014br But it r

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via Twitter: an apology.” though I’m not entirely sure what that means. Particularly in studio films women aren’t written as well a lot of the time, just as it had when Baldwin pushed against flaccid writing with a truly nasty Trump. I have a little cellulite, On Face the Nation, Sheriff Justin Smith the lead plaintiff in the suit said “What we’re being forced to do … makes me ineligible for office Which constitution are we supposed to uphold” There’s also an economic aspect of the suit The sheriffs from Colorado Kansas and Nebraska say the overflow of legal pot from Colorado into other states has cost neighboring states money in police overtime due to the higher levels of drug arrests Recreational marijuana was legalized in Colorado on January 1 2014 Write to Tessa Berenson at tessaberenson@timeinccomAfter 12-weeks of action and 135 matches Pro Kabaddi League 2017 got its first finalist A team that made their debut this season and relied more on teamwork rather than individual glory—Gujarat Fortunegiants In the first match on Tuesday at the NSCI Stadium Mumbai the Fortunegiants squared off against the Zone B table-toppers Bengal Warriors for a direct entry into the finals to be held at the Jawaharlal Nehru Indoor Stadium Chennai Though the rise of Fortunegiants in their debut season got everyone rooting for the team that came out of nowhere and settled itself right in the centre of the spotlight one of the major takeaways from this season would be the change in fortunes for the Bengal Warriors Fortunegiants in action against Bengal Warriors in 1st qualifier Image courtesy: PKL official website The Warriors were brushing off ghosts of the past seasons where they finished in the bottom half of the table more often than not by finishing right on top of the pile this time No one expected the Warriors to play the way they did and they managed to surprise their harshest critics time and again The last time these two teams met each other was in Ahmedabad the home of the Fortunegiants and the match ended in a tie Bengal Warriors were the only team that could return from Ahmedabad with their heads held high as it was the only match the Fortunegiants failed to win However on Tuesday no such thing happened as Gujarat Fortunegiants exposed Bengal Warriors’ weaknesses and capitalised on every little chance They dominated proceedings right from the first whistle The fact that Bengal Warriors could score just one point in the last eight minutes of the game was a reflection of how tight the Fortunegiants conducted Tuesday’s proceedings There was little separating both these teams in the first half as Gujarat had just a three-point lead with the scores at 13-10 at half-time The next 20 minutes saw Fortunegiants grow from strength to strength as Bengal Warriors became a pale shadow of their former self The final whistle went when the score was at 42-17 in favour of the Fortunegiants and they became the first team to book a spot in the finals where they would face the winner of the 2nd qualifier The second match of the day the third eliminator between Puneri Paltan and Patna Pirates was to decide which team would face Bengal Warriors in the 2nd qualifier on 26 October in Chennai The eliminator began with the Paltan defence neutralising Pirates’ star raider Pardeep Narwal in his very first raid Though it was the Pune team that scored the first points Narwal was back and started scoring at will to take the lead and in the ninth minute of play handed Pune an all-out to go 10-6 up Back on the mat Paltan played with a lot more aggression and Deepak Hooda led from the front to get one raid point after the other and reduce the points deficit With five minutes to go in the first half Paltan levelled the scores and refused to take thefoot off the pedal as they raced to a seven-point lead at half-time with the score reading 20-13 The second half began with numerousempty raids with both teams waiting for scoring opportunities in the do-or-die raids After five minutes of play the scores ticked over for both teams but the Paltan gradually started to consolidate the lead With nine minutes left and a trail of10 points it was time for Pardeep Narwal to conjure up some magic as he always does if the defending champions had to travel to Chennai A heavily contested Deepak Hooda raid that went in favour of the Patna Pirates unsettled the Puneri captain who looked demoralised after a decision he termed to be completely wrong Monu Goyat scored two points for the Pirates and then Narwal returned to the mat and proved why he is one of the greatest escape artists in Pro Kabaddi as he returned from a raid with four Paltan players trying to hold him down clinching four important points With momentum on their side it was the Narwal show once again as his team’s defence had a new-found aggression to deliver Narwal with his raiding prowess won 14 out of the next 17 points in the remaining six minutes to book their flight to Chennai where they would face Bengal Warriors for a shot at winning a hat-trick of titles While there was enough action on the mat during both matches to make the competition worthwhile a lot more action was yet to come After their match against Bengal Warriors Fortunegiants coach Manpreet Singh’s statement in the post-match press conference could have set the tone for a hostile final if Patna Pirates cross the next barrier Manpreet a former Patna Pirates player said "We have been in extremely good form and have played with high levels of confidence We have not let Pardeep score much against us in our matches against Patna We would like to play Patna Pirates in the finals because it will be easier for us to beat them to win the title" After the third eliminator Deepak Hooda who seemed visibly dejected with the refereeing lamented their bad luck as even a body touch didn’t show on the review?First elected to Congress in 1992 before losing his re-election bid in 2010, the drying ground across much of Minnesota has increased its capacity to absorb rain and snowmelt. including 31 GPS satellites that much of the world depends on.

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